Fashion / Spotlight Series

Spotlight Series #7 | Christian Louboutin … a fairytale of shoes!

Logo CLHey there my lovely followers,

I am finally back with ‘The spotlighting series’. Truth be told, I neglected these posts as thankfully I was busy focusing on other subjects to talk about and share with you guys. So today’s spotlight is going to be on none other than Christian Louboutin.  The man behind the coveted ‘red soles’ shoes. Adored by millions and dreamt about by many more including myself!

christianlouboutinforcrazyhorsecabaretbecoegorgeousSynopsis
Born in France in 1963, Christian Louboutin first started dreaming up fantastical footwear in his early teens. He was expelled from school at age 16 and started working for famed shoe designer Charles Jourdan two years later. In the early 1990s, Louboutin launched his own line of women’s shoes. He added his legendary red soles in 1993. In 2003, Louboutin expanded into women’s handbags. He then started up his men’s shoes line in 2011. To later venture in Beauty with his range of nail polishes and lipsticks.

Early Life
Born in Paris, France, in 1963, famed shoe designer Christian Louboutin had little interest in school growing up. He was the youngest child born to a cabinetmaker and a stay-at-home mother. His father wasn’t around much so Louboutin spent a lot of his early years in the company of his mother and three sisters.

CL sketchesLouboutin happened on his life’s passion by accident. All it took was a trip to a museum. He saw a sign indicating that high heel shoes were not permitted there. “I was totally fascinated by that sign. I’d never seen shoes like that,” he explained. Before long Louboutin was filling notebooks with his own shoe sketches. He was further inspired by a book of Roger Vivier’s designs given to him by a friend. Vivier designed shoes for Christian Dior in the 1950s.

Career Beginnings
Expelled from school at age 16, Louboutin soon went to work at the famed Parisian cabaret Folies Bergère. He did all sorts of jobs for the dancers, including fulfilling his personal dream of creating shoes for them. Louboutin then learned the ins and outs of the shoe business when he landed a job with Charles Jourdan in the early 1980s.

After working as a freelance designer for a time, Louboutin set up his own shop in Paris inRedsoles the early 1990s. He found the inspiration for his trademark red outer soles in 1993. “My assistant was sitting there, painting her nails red. I took one look and decided to color my soles red as a statement for the season, I thought, ‘Oh my god! Red soles are so flirtatious,’ and my customers asked me not to stop.” His artistic yet sexy shoes soon attracted the likes of Princess Caroline of Monaco, one of his early customers. Madonna wore his dangerously high heels in some of her videos, helping to introduce the world to Louboutin.

Later Successes
Over the years, Louboutin has continued to turn out season after season of imaginative footwear. “For inspiration, I often imagine a courtesan living out her life in a circus,” he explained to Marie Claire magazine. He has turned his surrealistically beautiful shoes into an international success story. According to The New Yorker, he sells more than 500,000 pairs of his fabulous footwear each year. The cost of getting a pair of Louboutins can range from nearly $400 up to $6,000. Louboutin has stores around the world in addition to his Paris headquarters.

In addition to women’s shoes, Louboutin has worked to expand his reach in fashion. He CL menbranched out into handbags in 2003, and he now offers a line of men’s shoes as well. In 2013, Louboutin will debut his new beauty line.

With all his success, Louboutin has worked hard to defend his designs from copiers and counterfeiters. He even took the fashion company Yves Saint Laurent to court over its use of red outer soles on some of its shoes. Louboutin also set up his own website to address the counterfeit shoe problem.

fetishOutside of his fashion empire, Louboutin has taken on some creative challenges. He worked with director David Lynch on a photo exhibit in 2007. In 2012, Louboutin helped design many elements of Feu, or “Fire,” a show at the legendary Parisian club Crazy Horse.

CL bookIn 2011, Louboutin celebrated his 20th anniversary with a new self-titled book, published by Rizzoli. Bound in pink faux leather with gilded pages and a five-piece fold-out cover, the book covers the designer’s most iconic styles as well as an insight into his influences and photos from his personal archives.

nailpolish CLOn 23 July 2014, Christian Louboutin Beaute launched a range of nail lacquers, exclusively debuting the signature red shade, Rouge Louboutin, at the Saks Fifth Avenue flagship in New York and its 15 US boutiques. In support of this launch, the high-end department store created Loubiville, a five-window visual merchandising display. The range will be later more widely distributed as from 6 August 2014 to stores like Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom and selected Sephora boutiques. It only seems fitting that Louboutin would enter the beauty market, as an assistant’s nail polish was the impetus for those famously-red soles. And much like the shoes, this luxury beauty product is receiving attention for its provocative.

So there you have it my shoe addiction explained and although I do not own a ‘red sole shoes’, like the LV bag and like the RC dress, I will own one …. someday!

Yet another Spotlight series came to end and I do hope you enjoy reading all about Mr. Louboutin.

Until next time,
XOXO

Caroline

 

Disclaimer : All of the information was gathered through various online sources.  Images Credit – Google Images.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s